A Local’s Guide to Llangynwyd

August 14, 2020

Scroll down page

Earlier this month, we spoke to Jo of Pentre Farmhouse to create an ultimate local’s guide to Llangynwyd.

Pentre Farmhouse, a grade-II listed building less than a mile from the historic village centre, is one of the oldest farms in the valley. The rural location of the rustic converted milk house makes it the perfect place to unwind and soak up the surrounding silence. Wake up to exploration straight from your doorstep with rugged bridleways lined with wildflowers, miles of cycle paths and acres of forestry to discover.

Tucked away within the sweeping valley of Llynfi, the medieval village of Llangynwyd makes for a perfect destination. Take a leisurely stroll along a picturesque hiking trail, put your nerves to the test on winding cycling routes or fall in love with local romantic tales.

Once you’re done exploring, stay overnight hidden amongst the woodlands in a colourful mongolian yurt, or a Grade II listed farmhouse, but not before indulging in a delicious dinner made from fresh local produce at one of Llangynwyd’s top local restaurants.

Explore

An ancient love story to rival Romeo and Juliet

Steeped in fascinating local legend, uncover the story of age-old love of two ill-fated lovers whilst soaking up the natural scenery of the valley. Folklore states that Ann, a local Welsh maid of the 18th century was pressured to marry into the wealthy family of the Maddocks despite her love for the poet and thatcher Will Hopkins. Despite being locked in her bedroom at the Manor House, the couple still sent one another love letters which were hidden in an old, hollow oak tree on the Cefn Ydfa estate.

Retrace the lovers steps with a hike from woodlands of Margam Forestry one mile towards the St Cynwyd's Churchyard, to find the final resting place of Ann Maddocks. Keep and eye out for the memorial cross outside the church which is dedicated to her love Will Hopkins.

Outdoor activities

Find the Soul of the Valley at the Spirit of Llynfi Woodland

Step into the tranquil greenspace of Spirit of Llynfi Woodland, dotted on the Eastern slopes of the valley. Explore the peaceful habitats of marshlands, meadows and heathland to find hiking paths for keen wild walkers, running trails and shaded seating areas. Delve beneath the surface to discover the area's long mining history, embodied by the Keeper of the Colliery, a grand oak sculpture which celebrates the lives and works of the local miners who once worked in the valley.

Fuel your adrenaline fix with adventure

On your marks, get set, and throw yourself into a range of thrilling throughout the local area with the Adventures Outdoor Activity Centre. Regardless of your age or abilities, put your bravery to the test with fun-packed, guided days out. Make a splash riding the waves in Porthcawl, scrabble down rocky cliffs or paddle down waterways on a rickety raft.

Dining out

Combine expansive views of the valley with your dining experience at The Old House, one of Llangynwyd’s staple culinary experiences. Dating back to 1147, enjoy everything from a traditional afternoon tea to speciality vegan dishes, all crafted using fresh local produce. Choose between Y Gadlys, an open plan dining area with stretching views of the vast Old House grounds and valley beyond, or The Cwtch, the ambient, thatched roofed 12th century restaurant.

Alternatively, head to the legendary Corner House Inn, home to delicious dishes and steeped in local legend. Once home to poet and thatcher, William Hopkins, the Corner House is a fascinating pitstop for historians and foodies alike. Why not try homemade pies or freshly caught fish dishes whilst sipping on Welsh ales.

Where to stay

Pentre Farm Holiday Accommodation

Pentre Farmhouse, a grade-II listed building less than a mile from the historic village centre, is one of the oldest farms in the valley. The rural location of the rustic converted milk house makes it the perfect place to unwind and soak up the surrounding silence. Wake up to exploration straight from your doorstep with rugged bridleways lined with wildflowers, miles of cycle paths and acres of forestry to discover.

Yr Hen Beudy Bach

Set in the heart of Llynfi Valley, Yr Hen Beudy Bach which translates as ‘The Old Little Stable’ is a great option for those seeking a charming cottage stay. The little stone building is conveniently located, meaning you’re perfectly positioned whether you want to cycle the valleys or head out for a bird-watching walk. Later, get grilling on the barbecue and enjoy the wild views from the patio. For the colder months, cosy up on the plush sofa before the wooden log-burner.

Ty Maen

Also situated in the centre of Llangynwyd, Ty Maen is a fantastic farm cottage option. Sleeping up to six people, hideaway amongst the valleys with the whole family in the beautiful barn conversion. The accommodation's elevated position boasts panoramic views extending down the valley. Located only a short stroll from the village’s array of restaurants and pubs, guests can choose between either whipping up a home-cooked meal or dining out.

Cwm Tawel Yurts

Extend your time in the Llangynwyd with a luxury overnight stay at Cwm Tawel Yurts, a hidden glamping haven suitable for all ages. Unwind with a local ale and a dip in the wood fired hot tub after a day of exploration, or enjoy a little alfresco dining with the authentic food-fired pizza oven. Soak up the beauty of the rural star-filled skies around the campfire before a deep night’s sleep in one of the colourful mongolian yurts which sleep up to five happy campers.


You may also like

View all inspirationRight Arrow

Follow us on Instagram @YourPorthcawl